Home News Four NED Girls Tech Start-up Deploys Laser Tag at Arena

Four NED Girls Tech Start-up Deploys Laser Tag at Arena

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Four NED Girls Tech Start-up Deploys Laser Tag at Arena

Final year projects play an important role in the future of students. They try hard to make their project a success. Though every final year project doesn’t become a successful commercial venture. Four NED Girls Tech Start-up Deploys Laser Tag at Arena.

But this is not the case with Armez as it has replaced the famous paintball shooting game at Arena in Karachi. And the very first day 82 games were played at Arena featuring the popularity of the made-in-Pakistan game. The engineering project Armez, is a project of four NED University students. The thing that makes this project different from others is that everything in this project was made from scratch.

Four NED Girls Tech Start-up Deploys Laser Tag at Arena

The team that included four NED University students from the electronics department, completed the project with their own expenses. They worked day and night in making the hardware for the shooting game and breaking gender stereotypes in the process. The successful deal with Arena is the proof that what tech start-ups can hold.

Sheena, Nimra Idrees Fazil, Ramla Kaleem Shah and Tahniat Hasan Khan worked really hard to make their project a success. Dr Muhammad Khurram, served as the project director while research, electronics and manufacturing work was done by the students.

While talking about the project a team member said,

“Our mentor pitched this idea. And we knew right away it will have market value both in terms of gaming and defense training.”

Fazil also added that,

“Armez provides first-person shooting game experience out in the open, enabling Counter Strike enthusiasts to practice tactics and be proactive and defensive in a physical environment with real people.”

How does it Work:

In the game players are given laser guns rather than paint ones. The jackets are also embedded with sensors. When the jacket gets hit by a laser, the player feels vibration and small bulbs signifying ‘game lives’ on the jacket light up to show ‘health level’. The gun stops working when a player’s ‘health level’ reaches its limit. All the hits and their timings are recorded and are shown on a computer screen to keep track of the game.