Mail-Demon Flaw Can Affect Every iPhone User

Recently, the tech-giant Apple confirmed a flaw that a security firm told may have left more than 0.5 billion iPhones exposed to hackers. The new information reports that the flaw is even greater. In April a bug, which is also present on iPads, was found by ZecOps, a San Francisco-based mobile security forensics firm.

Mail-Demon Flaw Can Affect Every iPhone User

ZecOps claims the vulnerability enabled hackers to remotely steal data off iPhones even if they were operating recent versions of iOS. If we consider the flaw itself it could have given access to whatever the Mail application had access to, which can also include confidential messages. However, according to the new evidence found by ZecOps, every iPhone ever built is vulnerable to the hacking.

Zuk Avraham, the CEO of ZecOps told that  “We continued our research of the MailDemon vulnerability,”  “We were able to prove that this vulnerability can be used for Remote Code Execution. Unfortunately, a patch is still not available.”

ZecOps in a blog post illustrates both the vulnerability and triggers, which it reports date all the way back to October 22, 2010, on an iPhone 2G operating on iOS 3.1.3.

Apple security expert and former researcher for the US National Security Agency Patrick Wardle told that the discovery “confirms what has always been somewhat of a rather terribly kept secret: that well-resourced opponents can remotely and silently infect fully patched iOS devices.”

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The company is reportedly working on setting this vulnerability in its upcoming iOS 13.5 release which is excellent news for owners of the iPhone 6S and newer. However, there is no news about whether Apple will release a patch for previous iOS versions to secure older devices still in use. To protect your smartphones the safest option is to disable the iOS Mail app and switch to Gmail or Yahoo.

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