Snapchat Dysmorphia: False beauty standards causing harm among girls

While this technology might help users increase their likes, it can also contribute to poor self-esteem and a condition known as “Snapchat dysmorphia.”

Snapchat dysmorphia is a form of body dysmorphia characterized by a strong desire to drastically edit one’s own digital photo. In the most extreme cases, the illness may lead to persons seeking cosmetic surgeries in order to replicate the edited images they post online.

Social networking apps foster perfectionism and harm human psyche, particularly in teens, to the point of suicidal ideation.

How the term Snapchat Dysmorphia coined?

After seeing that a growing number of patients were bringing heavily-edited selfies to their consultation visits instead of celebrity photos, a British physician recognised for doing cosmetic surgeries coined the term Snapchat dysmorphia. Patients who bring in severely edited selfies are frequently startled to realise that their changed photographic results cannot be recreated in real life, according to doctors.

Causes

This disorder is known as Snapchat dysmorphia because platforms like Snapchat and Instagram give filters that allow users to smooth out their skin tone and modify the contour of their features.

The impact of reality vs imaginary

Worse, these social media giants are well aware of the negative effects such applications can have on young women’s mental health.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Facebook’s internal study on Instagram demonstrates how harmful the app’s flawless filters and comparisons can be to youth’s mental health, particularly for young females.

According to the Dove Self-Esteem Project’s study, 60 percent of females are disturbed when their real-life appearance differs from their online presence.

“I simply want to adjust my filtered lips when I look in the mirror after taking a photo with them,” Demir remarked as she corrected her nose in her selfie.

Change your social media habits for better Self Image

 

Keep your expectations realistic. You’re not going to delete all of your accounts on social media. Instead, “consider your screen usage.” When you’re on, how can you be thoughtful and intentional?”

Make a list of your self-worth. This requires some contemplation, but it is eventually worthwhile. Take inventory of the important aspects of your life that contribute to your identity. Reminding yourself that you are more than your appearance in an image-obsessed culture seems clichéd.

Allow yourself to relax. Some of the things we’d say to ourselves would never be said to another person. She recommends meditating for one to two minutes each day. Concentrate on your sensations and ideas.

Nayab Khan

Nayab Khan is a freelance tech-writer whose specialty is absorbing the key data and articulating the most important points. She helps IT based organizations communicate their message clearly across multiple channels.
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