Chrome 88 Comes with Secure Password Protection Feature

Google is now rolling out the Chrome 88 globally with a new and more secure password protection feature. This new feature will allow users to check, identify, and fix weak passwords and enable them to control their saved passwords. According to Google, Chrome 88 with its new features will be available in all regions of the world in the coming weeks. This new update will keep getting new features throughout 2021.

The Google Chrome password manager is already saving a credentials of users for multiple platforms if the password is weak. While, this new update will enable users to quickly check, identify, and fix weak passwords from the Chrome Settings. So, users will be able to fix multiple weak passwords in one place.

Chrome 88 Comes with Secure Password Protection Feature

Ali Sarraf, Product Manager, Chrome posted in a blog, “Passwords help protect our online information, which is why it’s never been more important to keep them safe. But when we’re juggling dozens (if not hundreds!) of passwords across various websites—from shopping, to entertainment to personal finance—it feels like there’s always a new account to set up or manage. While it’s definitely a best practice to have a strong, unique password for each account, it can be really difficult to remember them all—that’s why we have a password manager in Chrome to back you up.”

In order to check passwords in Chrome 88, users will need to click on their profile image and then click the “key” icon. Other than that, users will also be able to type chrome://settings/passwords in the address bar. From there they can click check Password and the Chrome will start searching for weak passwords.

Once done, then users will be able to change weak passwords easily. Currently, the company is rolling out the update on desktop and iOS but Google says that soon the Chrome’s Android app will also be getting this new update.

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